If you’re a pet lover, you may have more than one pet. And if you’re like most people with more than one pet, you have at least one on a special diet. So what’s the best way to manage all of those different diets? Here are some tips that can make things a little bit easier.

Have Separate Food and Water Bowls for Each Pet

If you have multiple pets, it’s essential to have separate food and water bowls for each one. This will help to prevent any cross-contamination of diseases or illnesses. It also helps to track how much each pet is eating and drinking. If you notice that one of your pets is eating or drinking more than usual, it could signify a health problem.

Feed Pets on Opposite Sides of the House to Avoid Territorial Disputes

If you have more than one pet, you may want to consider feeding them on opposite sides of the house. This can help to avoid any territorial disputes that may occur. Cats are very territorial creatures and can often become aggressive if they feel their territory is being threatened. By feeding them on opposite sides of the house, you can help to avoid any potential problems.

Rotate the Type of Food You Feed Your Pets Every Few Weeks to Keep Them From Getting Bored

One of the challenges of feeding multiple pets is keeping them all interested in their food. If you feed them the same thing daily, they’re likely to get bored and may even stop eating altogether. To keep them from getting bored, try rotating the type of food you feed them every few weeks. This will help keep their interest levels up and may encourage them to eat more.

Some people find that feeding their pets a variety of different foods helps to keep them all healthy. If you’re concerned about their health, talk to your veterinarian about the best way to ensure that all of your pets are getting the nutrition they need.

No matter how many pets you have or their individual dietary needs, there are ways to ensure that they’re all getting the food they need. Following these tips can help make things a little bit easier on yourself and your pets.

Supplement Their Diets with Healthy Treats

Some pets are notoriously fussy eaters; many can be picky about their food. If you’re finding that your pets are refusing to eat the food you’re giving them, it may be time to supplement their diets with healthy treats. Look for treats that are high in protein and low in carbohydrates. You should also avoid giving treats that contain artificial flavors or colors. Pets usually prefer natural foods, so try to find treats made with natural ingredients.

It’s also an excellent way to bond with your pets and build a relationship with them. When you’re giving them treats, take the time to pet them and talk to them. This will help to create a strong bond between you and your pets, and it will also help to keep them healthy and happy.

Provide Plenty of Toys to Keep Them Amused

One of the challenges of having multiple pets is keeping them all amused. Pets can get easily bored, and if they don’t have anything to do, they may start causing trouble. To keep them from getting bored, provide them with plenty of games and toys you can find at your local pet store. 

In addition, you should also try to spend some time playing with them each day. This will help to keep their minds active and will also help to bond with them. When playing with your pets, make sure to use gentle movements and avoid violence. 

Make Sure All of Your Pets are Getting the Nutrition They Need

Pets have different dietary needs. To ensure that they are all getting the nutrition they need, you can do a few things.

First, try to feed them on a schedule. This will help ensure that they’re getting enough to eat and that their meals are spaced out appropriately. Second, rotate the type of food you feed them every few weeks to keep them from getting bored. And finally, supplement their diets with healthy treats. By following these tips, you can help ensure that your pets are all getting the nutrition they need.

If you’re concerned about your pets’ health, talk to your veterinarian about the best way to ensure that all of your pets are getting the nutrition they need with the best food you can provide. They can give you specific advice based on your pet’s individual dietary needs. By following their advice, you can help to keep your pets healthy and happy.

Conclusion

Having multiple pets can be challenging, but it’s also a lot of fun. By following these tips, you can help ensure that your pets are all healthy and happy. And you can also bond with your pets and build a strong relationship with them. So, don’t hesitate to get a few more cats – they’re worth the effort!





There’s nothing cuter than a puppy photo shoot. But dogs don’t always make the best photography subjects — no matter how much you want a perfect shot for Instagram. Check out these tips from Silver Paw Tags and get your canine client to cooperate for the most Instagram-worthy photos.

Prep for Photo Shoots in Advance

Working with dogs can sometimes be like working with young children. Your pet could be hungry, tired, overstimulated, or just plain bored when it comes time to snap pictures. To prevent meltdowns, plan your photography session for a calm time of day and set the scene accordingly.

If you’ll be taking photos in a public place or out in nature, make sure you have a leash close at hand and your pup is wearing their pet tag. No matter how well-behaved your dog may be, distractions could mean they take off on their own.

Your tone of voice and overall attitude can also impact the photo session experience for your pet. Be firm when giving commands, and even if you have a helper, use your familiarity with your dog to increase the odds of obedience. 

Embrace a Bit of Chaos

Perfectly timed snapshots make for a great Instagram photo grid, but embracing some unexpected chaos could result in an amazing memory (that earns lots of hearts). 

For example, you can make a video into a GIF if it’s hard to get a crisp portrait of your pup. Or, you might be able to crop out blurriness or unwanted background details.

If things go awry, embrace the moment and use your creativity to make a masterpiece — even if it’s a silly or blurry image.

Bring Snacks and Toys

This may sound like a no-brainer because every dog behaves better when snacks are offered. Yet using food in the photoshoot is another trick to capture a great shot. 

Case in point? Plenty of hilarious photos have resulted from dogs attempting to snatch treats out of the air. Even if your dog isn’t an accomplished treat-catcher, the resulting snapshot could be Instagram-worthy. 

Doling out snacks can also earn you some happy-face dog photos if your pet loves a certain type of treat. Toys can have the same effect, or you may stumble upon your pup enjoying playtime and capture an off-the-cuff shot, too.

Use Props Creatively

Toys and treats are great for ensuring your dog has a great time, but you can also use props to level up your Instagram-ready photo shoot. Wigs, hats, and accessories like bow ties can be fun if your dog is willing to cooperate.

Other props like artificial flowers, fancy tableware, or even produce can make for an eye-catching Instagram grid, especially if the lighting is flattering.  

Over-shoot to Better Your Odds

While not every image will be perfect, taking a video or using burst image capture increases the odds that you’ll have usable images. If you’re really struggling with a hyperactive pet, capturing a still image from your video might be a viable option.

Consider taking the same photo from different angles and perspectives, too. You never know which image will capture your dog’s personality and make for the perfect Instagram post.

Change Up the Scenery

Your dog can be cute anywhere, but all the Instagram expert pups know that the setting is key for great photos. One simple tip for changing up the scenery is to head out to your nearest park, beach, or another natural area.

Taking your dog to the beach is a fun experience for you both, and you can capture shots of them playing in the surf, running on the sand, and even enjoying the sunset.

Taking cute pictures of your dog is as simple as pointing and shooting, but with these tips, you can level up your Instagram game. Your pet might just become the next trendy pooch on the ‘gram, thanks to your creativity and patience!

 

While a chubby pet may appear to be cute and cuddly, the reality is that portly pets are more at risk for health issues, and sadly, a shortened lifespan. The increase in human weight has paved the way for our pets to follow and pet obesity appears to be on the rise.

Why Is Healthy Weight So Important for Pets?

Excess fat contributes to a wide array of animal health issues. Obesity strains your pet physically in every sense whether, heart, lungs, joints, muscles, ligaments, and tendons. This will make your pet want to move even less due to exhaustion and discomfort complicating an already dangerous health condition.

When our furry family members pack on pounds, they increase their risk for several serious health issues including:

  • Ambulatory issues
  • Arthritis
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Heart disease
  • Intervertebral Disc Disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver Problems
  • Orthopedic injuries such as ligament tears
  • Respiratory Difficulties
  • Skin and fur coat issues because of a lack of self-grooming

Apart from all the problems associated with weight-related diseases, the pets themselves experience reduced quality of life. Movement can be painful and prohibitive, and pets live shorter lives. 

Healthy choices are a great method for contrasting pet obesity, and you can make them to the benefit of your pet.

Is My Pet a Healthy Weight?

Aside from weighing your pet, an alternative method is to feel around your pet’s gut while they are in a standing position. Ribs and the animal’s spine should be easily felt and a minimal bit of fat should be present. The animal’s stomach should slope upward. This should also be visible when your pet is viewed from the side. Stomachs should not hang. If your dog or cat looks like a solid tube with no shape, then your pet Is probably too heavy. 

What Causes My Pet to Gain Weight?

Factors that contribute to weight gains in pets are the same as the principal causes in human weight gain:

  • Lack of physical activity or exercise
  • Overeating and excessive calorie intake
  • Aging
  • Mobility issues
  • Medical conditions

While some of these factors are beyond our control, a few important ones, like eating and exercise, are not.

Food and Feeding

When feeding your pet, his or her calorie intake needs to be equal to or less to the number of calories he or she burns daily. If your pet is overweight, you can opt for a weight management dog or cat food that will have increased amounts of fiber so there is a feeling of “fullness” while containing fewer calories. You can also reduce the amount of food you give. 

Once your pet has lost excess weight, you can switch to a healthy weight management food product.

You can schedule your pet’s meal to coincide with your mealtime.  If you feed your pet more than once a day, divide the total number of daily calories into the number of meals you give. Do not leave food out. If your pet leaves food, remove it.

Consider food allergies or intolerances that can contribute to weight issues. Your pet may do better with what is known as the ancestor diet such as provided by TimberWolfOrganics.com. These diets replicate the carnivorous natural diets that dogs and cats ate before domestication so they contain primarily protein and natural herbs. 

How Can I Get My Pet to Lose Weight?

There are several ways for you to reduce your pet’s weight:

  • Gradually increase physical activity and exercise. Do not rush to get your pet up and running. Any increase in physical activity should be slow.
  • Reduce edible treats to a minimum substituting them with other options or picking treats that contain a minimal number of calories.
  • Reduce the quantity of food that you are feeding.
  • Use a weight-loss pet food that will reduce calorie intake while integrating ingredients that make your pet feel fuller.

If you are committed to reducing your pet’s weight, follow your veterinarian’s recommendations as to how much weight needs to be lost and how quickly.

Tips for Keeping Your Pet at a Healthy Weight

  • Ask your veterinarian for an appropriate diet with portion size and follow your vet’s recommendation to the letter.
  • Feed your pet quality dog food at the same time every day.
  • No feeding from the table. People-food contributes to weight gain.
  • Do not indulge your pet with treats. Rather substitute food treats with attention, praise, toys, and games. Do not give in to pleading eyes and begging.
  • Dedicate time daily for a walk or exercise through play. Get your pet up and moving. Your pet should be involved in physical activity for at least a half-hour every day.
  • Schedule regular follow-up visits with your vet if your pet is on a weight loss plan. Assess weight, nutrition, and eventual health issues at regular intervals to monitor progress and make adjustments as necessary.

While it may be difficult to refuse that pleading look from your beloved pet, stick to the program to ensure that your fur baby enjoys a long and healthy life with you.

 

Dogs love to be out in nature enjoying some exercise. If you love to hike, or perhaps want to begin hiking as an exercise option, hiking with your best buddy can offer some great benefits from keeping you both active, improving health, and strengthening an already special bond.

Nonetheless, when setting out to hike on trails in open country, or in state and national parks, there are a few things to consider ensuring your and your dog’s safety. The top consideration will be having good command. A dog that responds to commands will be the first line of defense in hazardous situations.

Basic Training

If you don’t plan on keeping your dog on a leash or perhaps dealing with a dog that pulls in one direction or another, basic training is a must. As is investing in an ID tag in case your dog wanders off or gets lost. 

Taking an uncoordinated puppy or an untrained pooch on a hike is not recommended. Begin with short distances for your walks with your dog.

Before planning a long outing, make sure you have taught your dog basic commands. If necessary, enroll in a puppy class and engage in lessons with a qualified professional. Your dog should recognize and obey basic commands such as:

  • Come
  • Down
  • Leave it
  • Sit 
  • Stay

These basic instructions can save your dog’s life. Dogs are natural predators and hunters, so they will instinctively chase other animals, as well as investigate snakes, or dangerous terrain. They may also meet another hiker or another dog. This may not be a concern, but much will depend on if the other hiker dislikes or is afraid of dogs, or any communication between two canines upon meeting.

Information Update

Your dog should have a valid dog license. He or she should also wear dog ID tags that are always up to date with the correct contact information if you are separated. This single act could also save your life in case of an accident. Authorities will know whom they are looking for if they meet your dog. You can check out our ID tags here which we can engrave with your cell number. 

Many states require that all dogs older than four months of age be licensed yearly and this can often be done online. For techies, a technological option is a GPS tracker specifically made for dog collars or registered microchips.

Vaccinations

All your dog’s vaccinations need to be current before hiking, particularly the rabies vaccine. Should your dog meet a wild animal that has rabies and transmit the disease to your dog, it will be fatal if your dog has not been vaccinated.

Follow the Rules

Before beginning your hike, take the time to inform yourself whether the park or trail has regulations you both need to follow. The first thing to inquire about is if dogs are permitted in the area you want to hike in. If they are allowed to enter, must they be on a leash, or is vocal obedience training adequate? 

The National Park Services have the B.A.R.K. rule:

  • Bag Pooch’s waste
  • Always on leash
  • Respect Park wildlife
  • Know where you are permitted to go

Dog Gear for Hiking

There are several items that Pooch will need when out hiking with you.

  • Leash.

Even if you have the most obedient dog in the world, or the trail allows off-leash dogs, bring one anyway for eventual situations that can evolve like a hiker fearful of dogs or another aggressive dog on the trail. 

  • A Dog Bowl for drinking.

You and your dog will both be thirsty at some point.  There are collapsible, fold-up bags that you can slip into a pocket or in your backpack. The same can be used to feed your dog if you are camping overnight.

  • Harness 

A dog harness can be helpful if you need to put your dog on a leash at some point or if you want better visibility. Most harnesses have more than one attachment point for leashes, and most have reflective detailing. Some will even feature an ID pocket in the event your dog loses his or her tag.

If you will be camping, consider a harness that has pockets or side bags, so Pooch can carry his or her water and food.

  • Dog Boots in the event of rough terrain or cold weather.
  • Poop bags and anything else that is necessary.

Canine Safety When Hiking

Temperature

Consider temperature when hiking. If it’s cold for you, Pooch may need an extra layer of warmth as well, especially if a short-hair breed.

For excessive heat, bring extra water. Take rests in the shade and be watchful of symptoms of dehydration and exhaustion. Also, beware of hot surfaces like rocks or similar.

Insect Bites and Stings

If you are hiking in an area where ticks or wood ticks are present, make sure to have a repellent. At the end of your hike do a thorough tick search to remove any and use a specific tick-removal tool so as not to leave the head of the tick buried in Pooch’s skin. Bee and wasp stings will not be a concern unless your dog is allergic. Mosquitoes will bite you both.

Snakes and More

Snakes, rodents, bats, and porcupines as well as any larger animals should be avoided. Most of these animals are not interested in a confrontation and will not present a threat if their space is not invaded. This is the reason rabies vaccines should be up to date. If you will be hiking in an area known to have poisonous snakes, you should also consider snake training with a professional so your dog will know what to do. 

Canine First Aid

Basic canine first aid is a must, especially when adventuring out into the wilderness. If you are in the middle of nowhere and far from veterinary intervention, you will need to act. Research how to apply CPR, if there are toxic plants in the hiking area and consider any of Pooch’s pre-existing medical conditions or injuries.

Carry a few first-aid items with you such as cotton pads, a tick or stinger remover, disinfectant or hydrogen peroxide as well as non-stick bandages.

A Final Thought

Hiking is a wonderful activity to share with your four-legged best friend. With a bit of preparation, you’ll both have a fantastic adventure.

 

Cooler Weather Is Coming. Is Your Pet Ready?

Cool weather may not be here just yet, but, rest assured, it’s coming. And if you are a first-time pet owner, you should know that caring for your furry friend during the fall and winter requires a little more work than in the spring and summer. Silver Paw Pet Tags invites you to keep reading for a few things you should be aware of and ways to alleviate cold-weather woes.

Stiff joints

Perhaps one of the most unexpected issues surrounding cooler weather and pets is stiff joints. However, as OrtoCanis.com explains, cooler weather may trigger an inflammatory response. This can lead to joint discomfort and arthritis, particularly in older animals. One way to reduce pain is by giving your dog CBD oil, which can be mixed with their food. Be sure to discuss this with your vet first.

Behavioral issues

As pets spend more time indoors, you may find that they are anxious. They might bark, play a little too rough, or get aggressive when you get into their space. Because of this, it makes sense to invest in dog training, particularly if your dog is still a puppy. Look into online training programs you can work on at home together. 

Cold feet

According to the American Veterinary Management Association, dogs have different tolerance levels for the cold. Specifically on their paws, some animals are more prone to cold-weather injuries, such as cracked, rough, or bleeding paw pads. Make a point to check your pet’s feet every time you come in from the outside, even if the weather is not freezing. Some animals may be more comfortable outside in foot coverings made specifically for the cold.

Unintentional poisoning

While your dog may not be spending more time unsupervised outdoors, they do have more opportunities to come into contact with chemicals, such as antifreeze, that can make them sick during the winter months. Animal Emergency Care cautions that even a small amount of antifreeze on your dog’s feet can be deadly if he licks himself after coming into contact. Make sure to wipe your dog’s legs and feet really well after you’ve been outside together. 

You can either purchase inexpensive grooming wipes, or make some yourself with basic ingredients. A quick sprucing up after outdoor trips can save you some heartache—and the cost of an emergency vet bill.

Allergies

Allergies are mostly associated with the spring, but fall brings mold and other irritants to the air. If you notice that your dog has more eye or nasal discharge, diarrhea, or is scratching and chewing himself more often, call your veterinarian.

Other tips

A few other things you can do for your dog this fall to keep them safe and healthy include:

  • Scheduling their annual wellness visit
  • Investing in a new ID tag with your name and phone number
  • Continuing with flea and tick preventative
  • Watching the weather, and keeping them indoors as much as possible when the temperature is below freezing
  • Investing in a cozy and durable indoor dog house for pups with a shorter coat
  • Feeding them a healthy diet
  • Providing plenty of shelter outdoors or installing a dog door so they can come in from the cold
  • Spending as much time with them as possible to reduce anxiety

Having a pet is hard work. Having a pet in the fall and winter is even more so since you don’t have the freedom of letting them run free. But just because it’s work doesn’t mean it’s not worth it. The advice above can help you be a better pet parent so that you can enjoy your pet no matter the season.

When you want a quality dog tag that’s rust, chew, scratch and salt water-proof, you want a Silver Paw Pet Tag. Our stainless steel tags have a lifetime guarantee, and they come in sizes small, medium and large. Check out our selection today! 

Do you feel concerned about stray animals, neglected pets, or even suffering wildlife in your area? You don’t have to sit idly by – you can reach out and help! Silver Paw Pet Tags has collected plenty of resources to spark your inspiration!

Easy Ways to Help

You don’t have to have any special skills to help animals in need – there are so many things that an individual can do to pitch in!

  • Are there any proposed pieces of legislation for your area concerning animal welfare? You can call up your representatives to share your opinion!
  • You may notice strays or wildlife roaming around your home. This guide will help you decide who to call for help if necessary.
  • Are you interested in getting a pet of your own? Consider fostering.

Support Local Organizations

Do you want to connect with other people who share a passion for the same cause? Check out these local organizations!

  • You can donate to an organization like Paw Works, which aims to help animals find good homes. 
  • If you want to contribute to rescue programs, you can direct your donations to The Humane Society.

Start a Nonprofit

What if you want to take your efforts even further? With some patient planning, you can start a nonprofit! 

  • Need to work out the details of your idea? You’ll want to create a nonprofit business plan. 
  • If you’re searching for additional funding, you can apply for grants. 
  • Planning to hire employees for your business? QuickBooks’ article on payroll defined covers everything you need to know about paying your workers and reporting taxes. 
  • Want to bring people together in support of animal welfare? Host a fundraising event!

Many people feel compassion for animals in need. From volunteering at shelters to donating money to running your own nonprofit, there is no shortage of ways to make a difference. By referencing these resources, you’ll be able to make a positive change in the lives of animals.

Silver Paw Pet Tags creates beautiful, stainless steel dog ID tags that are guaranteed to last the lifetime of your companion. Explore our hand-cast small, medium, and large dog tags!

Photo via Pexels

If you’re the owner of a brand new business as well as a new puppy, you may be wondering what you’ve gotten yourself into. Both require significant time and energy, and they will suffer if you neglect them. The good news is you can nurture each of them to develop successfully with proper attention, patience and the right tools. The following tips from Silver Paw Pet Tags demonstrate how you can use a crate to train your puppy, focus on your business and preserve your sanity all at the same time.

Purchase Two Crates

If possible, purchase two crates: one for a quiet area of the house, such as a bedroom, and one for your office. Sometimes your business requires 100 percent of your attention, and the crate holds the puppy out of harm’s way.

Keeping your business and personal assets legally separate helps provide for your safety too. To accomplish this, along with possible tax benefits, register your business as a Maine LLC. It’s easy and inexpensive whether you file the LLC paperwork yourself or use a formation service so you won’t need an expensive lawyer to handle it.

Make the Crate Comfortable for Your Puppy

Effective crate training hinges upon your dog viewing the kennel in a positive light. That means your puppy should recognize the crate as a personal space where he or she feels safe and comfortable. Use a soft crate pad that fits the dimensions of the bottom and cover the top with a blanket or towel, leaving the front open so the puppy can see out one side. Setting the crate up this way will work well with your dog’s denning instinct.

  • Allow the puppy to explore the crate freely with the door open at first.
  • Leave a treat inside the kennel for the puppy to find, and coordinate the timing with closing the crate door.
  • Create a routine for going into the crate by saying the same phrase, tossing in a small treat, adding a favorite toy or other repeated action.
  • Avoid leaving anything in the box that your puppy could choke on while unsupervised.
  • Never use the crate as punishment or speak harshly when it’s time to go in.

Avoid Future Separation Anxiety

Giving your puppy crate time away from you in a quiet area of the house teaches your pet that it’s OK to spend time alone. Expect some whining and barking at first, just like a baby who doesn’t want to go down for a nap. In most cases, the puppy will settle, but if not, there are barking deterrents you can place outside the crate to help train your young pet to be quiet.

Use a Special Reward for Time in the Crate

When you need to leave your puppy alone for an extended period, make the experience positive by providing a special, long-lasting treat. Use a Kong or other tough, treat-dispensing toy and fill it with goodies the animal has to work at to get out. Freezing the food inside the toy makes it last a long time. That way, your dog is occupied with a rewarding activity when you are away or out of sight. In most cases, the puppy will fall asleep after working hard to get the treat out.

Used properly, a crate can be an effective training tool and a safe, secure place for your pet to nap or work on a chew toy. It also helps you get back to work when your business needs your complete focus.

 

Image Courtesy: Pexels

You love your dog, and he loves you. He’s your best buddy, and you do everything together. You’ve given him a great home, and the best cushy bed in the house. But have you overlooked something?  When you walk into the coffee shop, do people smile warmly, or do they sigh in annoyance? At the dog park, do the people seem eager to meet you? 

In other words, you’ve mastered the basics of obedience training, but have you taught your pup how to conduct himself in public? 

Cleanliness Is Next To Godliness:

Rule number one of good pet stewardship is this: scoop the poop.  Carry bags and gloves with you on your walks in public to collect the waste and dispose of it properly. No one wants to step in a dog mess on a sidewalk or in the grass. Dog feces are a health hazard to people and other dogs; they can harbor bacteria that can be spread to other people and animals. Bring wet wipes with you in case your pet gets himself muddy. No one likes to meet a muddy dog who shakes goo all over your clothes.

Personal Space:

Even the most well-behaved dog can react unexpectedly to new situations, so yours should be trained to walk on a leash. This helps you to control his responses and helps you to keep him safe. Your pet may be friendly, but a threat from another animal could cause him to bolt. 

Respect the privacy of other people and pets by teaching your dog not to approach strangers without your say-so. Always ask other people if it’s okay before you approach with your dog. They may have allergies, phobias, or simply not want to be bothered. If they have their own pets with them, you don’t know how the other pet will react to yours, so always ask before making introductions. When you get the okay, allow the two dogs to greet each other by sniffing, but be watchful for signs of aggression. Raised, bristled tails are a sign they may be gearing up to attack, and a lowered back with hackles raised means the dog is frightened and may be dangerous. 

Silence Is Golden:

We all know that dogs bark, but there are many places where this behavior is not appropriate. Your dog must be trained to be quiet. Learn to redirect his attention to you when barking occurs, and work on getting him accustomed to the presence of other animals around him to reduce unnecessary noise.  Use plenty of positive reinforcement; when your dog barks at something, redirect his attention and give him a treat and lots of petting. 

Good Manners:

Perhaps the most important task to making your dog a more welcome guest is teaching him good public etiquette skills. When you go out in public together, you and your dog should set a good example. Obedience training can be helpful for these situations. Teach your dog not to jump on people, approach them uninvited, or to beg for food. Be mindful that your dog will make the occasional misstep, so be willing to own up to it and apologize when something happens. If your dog damages something (say, he chews a shoe or splashes mud on someone’s slacks), be prepared to open the checkbook and make good on what he ruined. 

Be A Responsible Pet Parent:

Sadly, not everyone wants to see your dog. Call ahead and check that it is okay to bring him. Check out local shops and restaurants and learn their pet policies before you show up. Know the rules and respect them. When you are out with your dog, he should always be wearing his collar and tags, and his certifications and shots should always be up to date. If he becomes lost, rescuers will have an easier time reuniting you. Consider microchipping your pet for an additional layer of protection. A lost dog without tags or a collar is in danger of being labeled as abandoned, and could wind up at the local pound. A dog without up-to-date shots is in even more jeopardy. 

Stay Golden at Home Too:

A well-trained dog can still be a nuisance to your neighbors. Remember what we talked about with barking? Don’t allow your pet to bark and make incessant noise that could be a disturbance. Teach your dog to stay calm when anyone comes to the door, and never allow them to jump on anyone. Finally, never let your dog roam freely off-leash. Not only can this make your neighbors uncomfortable, but it’s also a safety risk for your pet. 

If you really want to give your pet room to roam, invest in a fence around the perimeter of your home. While this can be a costly endeavor (the average price is $4,500), it’s worth the price if your dog can safely run around without bothering anyone. Talk to nearby fencing companies to get a few quotes, but be sure to check out reviews and ratings before you hire a contractor. Don’t be shy about asking to look at a portfolio or for a special offer either. 

Your dog is still a dog, and he’s going to dog things. He’s going to bark, run, snuffle leaves, and ask people to stop what they’re doing and pet him. The trick is to minimize the behaviors that earn him disapproval and encourage those that make him more loveable. The whole point of good “petiquette” is to help your dog show the world his best face so everyone around you can see just why you love him so much. If you teach him good manners and social skills, he’ll be loved by more people, ensuring you’re both welcome wherever you go. 

A dog ID tag is the perfect way to make sure your dog is never lost. For a durable tag that’s also stylish, check out the varieties offered by Silver Paw Pet Tags. Their steel tags are handmade in Maine, and are chew-proof, rust-proof and scratch proof. Visit the website to see their selection today! 

How to Ensure a Smooth Transition When Moving with a Pet

Moving to a new home is exciting, but it can also get stressful. If you’re moving with a pet, the process can get even more complicated. Cats and dogs are especially sensitive to new surroundings and may get nervous about the transition.

In some cases, cats and dogs may be so bewildered by their new surroundings that they will run away. Before you move, ensure your pet’s tags are up-to-date with your new address and contact information. If they get lost, it will be easier to reunite. Silver Paw Pet Tags offer stainless steel dog tags that are durable and easy-to-read.

Read on for more tips on how to ensure a move that is both stress-free and safe.

Pack up your pet’s essentials in one easy-access box

Before you move, set aside one box for your pet’s essentials. Include the things you will need in the first days after you arrive, such as food, treats, medicine, and a leash and collar. Keep this box separate from other moving boxes. Instead of sending it with the moving truck, pack it in your car. This ensures you have everything your pet needs when you arrive.

Prepare your pet emotionally and physically for traveling

Before moving day arrives, prepare your pet mentally and physically for the process. Preventive Vet has guidelines on how to prepare your cat, starting with getting them used to their carrier However, if you’re moving with a dog, check out these tips from USA Today. They recommend using a carrier or kennel in the car to keep your pup safe while driving. Placing a t-shirt that smells like you into the carrier with your dog can help alleviate nerves.

Ensure your pet’s health and identification records are updated

Before you move, take your pet for one last veterinary checkup. Ask your veterinarian for a copy of your pet’s health records to bring with you, especially their vaccination record. Beware that rabies vaccination requirements vary between states. If you’re moving across state lines, Fido or Fluffy may need a booster. Finally, make sure the contact information on your pet’s collar tag or microchip is correct.

Set up your animal support system in the new location in advance

When you see your veterinarian, you can also ask them if they have recommendations for an animal hospital in your new home’s location. If not, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has tips on how to find an accredited vet wherever you go. In addition to veterinary care, look into local groomers, kennels, and pet sitters or walkers — whatever your animal may need. You can use online resources like Care.com to find local professionals.

Secure affordable transitional housing if needed

Moving if you’re strapped for cash can be tough. If you’re in this situation, Redfin recommends arranging accommodation with a friend or family member while you look for a job and housing. Make sure your loved one can accommodate your pet, too. If they live in a rental property, they should check the regulations to ensure animals are allowed.

Set aside a quiet space in the new home to help your pet feel comfortable

Once you make it to your permanent home, take steps to make your pet comfortable. Set aside a quiet space for them away from the hustle and bustle of movers. If you have a cat, introduce them to their new surroundings slowly. Meanwhile, if you have a dog, check out these tips from the American Kennel Club. For example, they recommend taking the dog through the house on a leash as a first step.

 

Moving with a pet requires some extra planning, but it doesn’t have to be stressful. Follow the above steps to prepare for a comfortable transition for you and your favorite furry friend.

Photo Credit: Pexels.com

Top Travel Tips for Dogs and Their Owners

Are you and your pooch planning a special getaway together? Adventures with your four-legged friend can be big fun for you both so long as you take a little time to make plans with your favorite sidekick in mind. Read on for how to ensure that both you and your dog can make the most of every moment next time you hit the road.  

Destination Unknown?

When you’re ready to explore fresh territories with your canine companion, think about choosing a destination agreeable to you both. For instance, a chilly mountain trek could be the perfect fit if your furry friend is a cold weather lover. For dogs that love water, a vacation centered around swimming and boating could be a dream come true. Dogs with flat faces, on the other hand, generally do best with low-energy activities and mild temperatures. 

Meshing climate and activities can help you get started on choosing the perfect spot for your next getaway. Also, search out dog-friendly locations that fit your anticipated plans. There are many places that don’t welcome dogs, so a little research can go a long way to ensuring your adventures are successful. For example, you might think all the national parks are the same as far as pet policies, but some are more dog-friendly than others. Along those same lines, some beaches welcome dogs and some don’t, or if an urban adventure is calling your name, certain cities are particularly accommodating to canine companions.  

Gear Up for Fun

Getting to and from your destination can be half the fun so long as you’re outfitted for success.  Car trips are more bearable with appropriate travel gear, such as a seat cover, travel bowls, and a restraint to keep your dog safely in his seat. Also, think about other accessories that will make experiences more comfortable. If trails or tents are part of your travel plans, your pooch can tote his own supplies with a well-chosen backpack, although there is a surprising variety, so read reviews to select the best one for your dog. Swimming and other water-oriented outings might require a doggy life jacket, and some dogs require coats for cold temps or cooling vests for heat. Thoughtful accessories can equate to delightful fun and less chance for misadventures.  

Safe Travels

For safety’s sake, include some dog-oriented first aid supplies in your travel gear in case there’s an incident. Similarly, your dog should wear an up-to-date, easy-to-read ID tag on the chance he slips away, and make a trip to the vet to ensure your dog’s vaccinations are current. If your dog has any special medical conditions, bring along copies of pertinent records, and research the veterinary clinic or hospital closest to your destination. You can use this search tool to help. Bring your dog’s prescription medications along as needed, and if your pooch is on a special diet, pack enough for your trip plus a bit extra in case you experience delays.  

Where Shall We Dine?

Whether you’re looking for opportunities to stop on the way to and from your destination, or weaving some Fido-friendly events together in your travel agenda, eateries that accept furry companions can ease some of your traveling angst. Many outdoor cafes are dog-friendly, and some chain restaurants allow pets as well. So you, your dog, and other diners all have a good time, Food & Wine suggests brushing up on your pooch’s table manners. And last but not least, when it comes to keeping things enjoyable for everyone, remember to pick up after your pooch.

Planning and preparation can make a world of difference when you’re taking a trip with your dog. Choose a hospitable destination, invest in the appropriate gear, and think about ways you can ensure your getaway is safe and fun for everyone. You and your furry traveling companion are sure to enjoy the vacation of your dreams, thanks to your thoughtful planning.

Travel Tips for Dogs and Their Owners